The Butler Seminar on Religion and World Civilization, in collaboration with the Desmond Tutu Center, will present its 20th lecture series, “Religion and Reconciliation in Global Perspective,” beginning with “The Risks of Reconciliation” September 23 in Butler University’s Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts.

The seminars will take place from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Admission is free and open to the public without tickets. For more information, call 317-940-8253.

The topics for the seminars will be: “The Risks of Reconciliation” (September 23);  “Does Reconciliation Actually Happen?” (October 28); “Reconciliation in Islamic Thought and Practice” (January 27, 2015); “Truth and Reconciliation with Native America” (February 24); and “Russia and Ukraine: Is Reconciliation Possible?” (March 17).

More about each event follows.

THE RISKS OF RECONCILIATION
September 23
Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts

Boesak

Boesak

Keynote speaker: Allan Aubrey Boesak, the Desmond Tutu Chair of  Peace, Global Justice, and Reconciliation Studies at Christian Theological Seminary and Butler University. He also directs the Desmond Tutu Center for Peace, Global Justice, and Reconciliation, a joint program of Butler and Christian Theological Seminary.

Respondent: Robin Turner, assistant professor of political science at Butler University, where her work includes Southern African studies.

In pious portrayals of the subject, the risks and challenges of reconciliation are often left out of the picture, as is the question: is it worth it? Boesak will inaugurate the series with a frank discussion of the hazards of pursuing the politics of reconciliation in our time.   

 

DOES RECONCILIATION ACTUALLY HAPPEN?
October 28
Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts

Villa-Vicencio

Villa-Vicencio

Keynote speaker: Charles Villa-Vicencio, Georgetown University

Respondent: Allan Aubrey Boesak, Christian Theological Seminary

Villa-Vicencio will assess the prospects of reconciliation with attention to ethnic and religious conflicts which are impeding the development of civil society in South Africa and other parts of Africa today. 

 

 

RECONCILIATION IN ISLAMIC THOUGHT AND PRACTICE
January 27, 2015
Shelton Auditorium, Christian Theological Seminary

Moosa

Moosa

Speakers: Ebrahim Moosa, University of Notre Dame, and Marcia Hermansen, Loyola University, Chicago

Moosa and Hermansen will assess the concept of reconciliation from an Islamic perspective. Does the concept have the weight in Islam that it has in Christian theology? What can Muslim leaders and activists contribute to the politics of reconciliation in 21st-century conflicts?   

 

 

 

TRUTH AND RECONCILIATION WITH NATIVE AMERICA
February 24
Shelton Auditorium, Christian Theological Seminary

Attean

Attean

Speakers: Esther Attean, University of Southern Maine; Denise Altvater, Perry, Maine

Respondent: Siobhan McEvoy-Levy, professor of political science at Butler University whose teaching and research focus on reconciliation efforts worldwide.

Esther Attean and Denise Altvater, members of the Passamaquoddy tribe, are founders of the Wabanaki Truth and Reconciliation program, a project involving the State of Maine and five Native American tribes. Initiated by the American Friends Service Committee, the Wabanaki program applies the truth and reconciliation concept to the injustices that have characterized relations between Native Americans and the majority population in the United States.

RUSSIA AND UKRAINE: IS RECONCILIATION POSSIBLE?
March 17
Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts, Butler University

Sigov

Sigov

Keynote speaker: Konstantin Sigov, professor of philosophy and religious studies at the National University of  Kyiv-Mohyla,  Kiev, Ukraine

Respondent:  Elena Glazov-Corrigan is associate professor of Russian literature at Emory University in Atlanta

The Ukrainian revolution of 2014 and Russia’s response to it have disrupted the longstanding ties of religion and culture connecting the two nations. What, if anything, can the truth and reconciliation concept offer Russians and Ukrainians who seek to repair their relationship?

 

 

The Seminar on Religion and World Civilization is a program of the Center for Faith and Vocation at Butler University, promoting understanding of interfaith and intercultural relations through the discussion of religious issues in global perspectives.

The Demond Tutu Center for Peace, Reconciliation, and Global Justice, a joint project of Butler University and Christian Theological Seminary, promotes the legacy of Archbishop Desmond Tutu with his holistic understanding of reconciliation grounded in justice, human dignity, and social transformation. 

 

Media contact:
Marc Allan
mallan@butler.edu
317-940-9822